Producing CRISPR/Cas9-derived Chrysanthemum mutants with reduced stem length for cut flower and pot-plant breeding
Research project 10
Project researcher: Dr. Idan Efroni

The use of growth retardants to suppress growth is a common practice in ornamental production. Chrysanthemum, one of the leading ornamental crops, is treated routinely with growth retardants to inhibit excess shoot and flower-pedicel elongation. Growth retardants are inhibitors of gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis. Thus, the development of Chrysanthemum with reduced GA activity is an important goal. The major objective of this research project is to develop Chrysanthemum plants with reduced stem length, a desired trait for both cut flowers and pot plants (different degrees of growth suppression). To achieve this goal, we will generate CRISPR-derived gid1 (loss-of-function) and della (gain-of-function) mutants. These mutant plants will be used for Chrysanthemum breeding for cut flowers and pot plants.

Research project 10

Project researcher:

Dr. Idan Efroni

Dr. Idan Efroni
Project researcher

Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Email: idan.efroni@mail.huji.ac.il

Phone: +972-8-9489252

Website: Dr. Idan Efroni

Laboratory website

Research areas:
Gene editing, non coding sequences and developmental regulation.

Research partner:

Dr. Naama Gil

Dr. Naama Gil
Research Associate

Email: naama.gil@mail.huji.ac.il

Research areas:
Gene editing, non coding sequences and developmental regulation.

Institution:
Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Photographs: Yoram Aschheim